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Full TGIF Record for: 134701
Author(s):Wax, Richard
Author Affiliation:Member, Editoral Board, Golf Course Architect
Title:The innovator: Legendary golf architect Pete Dye transformed course design in the 1970s and 1980s. But his legacy goes much further than island greens and railway sleepers. Now in his eighties, Dye remains passionate, opinionated and active. Richard Wax spoke to him and wife Alice to the the Dye gospel
Item is a:*Professional
*Interview
Source:Golf Course Architecture. Vol. 11, January 2008, p. 34-35, 37, 39, 41, 43.
# of Pages:6
Publishing Information:Leicester, England: Tudor Rose
Keywords:TIC Keywords: Personal profile; Golf course architects; Golf course design; Leadership; Professionalism; Golf course construction; Golf course development; Career growth; Women in golf; Strategic design
Subjects' Names:Dye, Pete
Abstract:Profiles golf course architect Pete Dye, explaining that "from reintroducing the influence of traditional Scottish and Irish links golf forms to the worldwide game to training some of the greatest designers in the game...the former insurance salesmen from Indiana is a towering figure in the profession." Presents an interview with Dye in which he suggests that "because of the environment and the cost of land, architects are faced with government regulations, and they are given swamps or other areas that are not really great for golf. So they have to manufacture." Suggests that Alice Dye has "worked hard on making forward tees shorter and more manageable for women." Explains that "most of [Dye's] competitors have a staff of five, ten, fifteen, twenty or thirty people. With [Dye] it's [associate Tim Liddy] and [him]." Suggests that an architect "can spend a lot of money building a golf course but if you have people on site they can change it three or four times and it doesn't escalate the cost either of maintenance or construction." Explains that in the Dominican Republic, "once the golf course was built, all of a sudden people started to come, even though they had to drive along the dirt road and there were just cabins to stay in." Suggests that "if [the architect builds] it right, then the superintendent has a fighting chance to maintain it." States that Dye "got the reputation of designing severe golf courses but women can play [the] courses and yet men say it's the hardest thing in the world." Suggests that Dye is "part genius and part knucklehead, he could not only come up with crazy ideas but convince a client to buy into it" and that "nobody in this business comes close to Pete in combining creative work and a unique personality."
Language:English
References:0
Note:Includes sidebar, "Working with Pete", p. 39
Note:Pictures, color
 ASA/CSSA/SSSA Citation (Crop Science-Like - may be incomplete):
Wax, R. 2008. The innovator: Legendary golf architect Pete Dye transformed course design in the 1970s and 1980s. But his legacy goes much further than island greens and railway sleepers. Now in his eighties, Dye remains passionate, opinionated and active. Richard Wax spoke to him and wife Alice to the the Dye gospel. Golf Course Archit. 11:p. 34-35, 37, 39, 41, 43.
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